North Terminal at Gantry Park Shared with Astoria Line

NYC Ferry Opens LES Line, Quick Connections for Us to New Neighborhoods

Updated 3 weeks ago
We now share the LIC Gantry Park Landing with the Lower East Side route.
We now share the LIC Gantry Park Landing with the Lower East Side route.
© David Stone / Roosevelt Island Daily

“It’s official – the initial six routes of NYC Ferry system are now up and running,” said Mayor de Blasio. “NYC Ferries have turned the East River, which once divided New Yorkers, into a point of connection..." The new Lower East Side route is especially good for Roosevelt Islanders seeking adventure and discovery.

The LES route begins it's journey toward Wall Street just five minutes from Roosevelt Island at Gantry Park, the first stop on our Astoria route's southward journey, then shares a parallel path across the East River to 34th Street.

It's there where things change. Astoria speeds on an express run to Wall Street, and the Lower East Side ferries duck first into Stuyvesant Cove before going on to Corlears Hook.

NYC Ferry Opens LES Line, Quick Connections for Us to New Neighborhoods
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While both stops are packed with history, Stuyvesant Cove is likely to be the most family friendly as the landing is adjacent to Stuyvesant Cove Park, a large public relaxation and play zone that separates the city neighborhood from the river.

We're hoping local historian Judy Berdy has more to say about it, but for now, we'll say that Corlears Hook is famous as one of several claimed sources for the term "hookers."

Described in the 18th Century  as “fashionable East Side Hills where chasing the hounds was the vogue,” the "Hook" saw its first tenement built in 1833. "By 1839, eighty-seven brothels were situated in the Hook.”

Contemporary accounts tell us the brothels are all gone, but history has been absorbed in every acre of land.

Read more in Corlears Hook in 1820, The Wagnerian Cult and Our Manners, originally published in 1904.

 

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